faq

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HOW MUCH OF A DEPOSIT IS REQUIRED?

 

Payment is due upon completion of all residential single family homes and not a penny upfront should ever be given to any company or association.

Deposits asked for by any roofing company should be a BUYER BEWARE red light warning that perhaps they do not have a strong financial backing to endeavor the project in question. Upon completion we accept CASH  CHEQUE  CREDIT CARD  E TRANSFER  and  HAVE FINANCING OPTIONS AVAILABLE.

CAN I JUST RE-ROOF OVER MY OLD ROOF?

 

The short answer is definitely not.

At RaiseEmUp we are firm advocates for doing the job properly and ensuring that the project is completed without any potential for old problems coming back. This is often the reason why replacing the roof is necessary, because of an existing problem that the old roof system is not covering.

The best practice is to remove the old roof, inspect the roof substrate and then ensure the structural integrity of the system such as rotten areas product of water penetration. Keeping an old roof will not only compromise the installation of the new one but could further create new issues of water penetration and mold or exacerbate existing ones.

Therefore both for aesthetic and safety reasons re-roofing over an existing roof is never a good idea.

HOW DO I TELL IF I NEED A NEW ROOF?

 There are several signs that will show if your roof needs replacement or repairs, even before you have a leaky roof. Look for curling or cracked shingles, granular loss or patches where you can see the black asphalt below. Occasionally, fixing a leaky roof is only a matter of replacing a few shingles. However more often, missing shingles are an indicator the roof may have outlived its longevity because the shingles are no longer secured by the fastener. In this case, it is necessary to replace the entire roof. 

ARE YOU GOING TO DROP A DUMPSTER ON MY DRIVEWAY?

RaiseEmUp Roofing uses trailers for garbage removal on residential roof replacement projects. The rubber tires on our trailers do not mark or damage driveways (large roll off bins used for waste removal can mark and cause damage to a driveway – we do not use these!). 

ARE YOU INSURED AND DO YOU HAVE WSIB?

We are fully insured, WSIB compliant and all members of our team have their Working at Heights

training from the Ministry of Labour

DO YOU NEED TO PEEL THE PLASTIC STRIP FROM THE SHINGLE BACK?

 The plastic release film on the back of roofing shingles does not need to be removed. The sole purpose of this tape is to prevent the shingles from sticking together in the package.  Once the shingles have been removed from the package and are applied in the correct orientation on the roof, the release tape serves no purpose whatsoever.  The shingle sealant, which bonds the shingles together, is located elsewhere on the shingle and will seal succeeding courses of the shingles together on the roof when warmed by the heat of the sun, soon after application. 

ASK US A QUESTION?

If you would like more information from one of our experienced team of  Roofers free to ask us a question! 

ASK US A QUESTION

that's roofing

Roofing Glossary

 

  • Algae Discoloration: Black streaks or discoloration caused by the growth of algae on your roof.
  • Blisters: Bubbles that may appear on the asphalt roofing materials after they are installed.
  • Bundle: A package of shingles. Three bundles of standard shingles will cover one roofing square [10’x10′ or 100 ft2].
  • Caulk: Used to fill joints or cover nail heads to prevent leaks.
  • Closed Valley: A type of valley where the shingles are installed over the valley flashing, so that the flashing is not exposed.
  • Collar: A flange placed over a stack type vent to seal the roof around the pipe, also referred to as a vent sleeve.
  • Counter Flashing: A flashing that is attached to a vertical surface (such as a wall) to prevent water from seeping under a base flashing.
  • Course: A row of shingles that runs the length of the roof.
  • Deck/sheathing: The wood installed over the frame of the house to which the roofing is applied.
  • Dormer: A small structure projecting from a sloped roof, usually with a window.
  • Drip Edge: A non-corrosive metal flashing installed along the lower edge and often up the rake of the roof. Its purpose is to direct water draining from a roof into the gutters, preventing damage to the underlying construction.
  • Eaves: The horizontal, lower edge of a sloped roof.
  • Fascia: A flat board, band or face located at a cornice’s outer edge.
  • Felt (Tar) Paper: A fibrous paper, saturated with asphalt to be used as an underlayment, to increase roof protection.
  • Flashing: Pieces of galvanized metal that are used to prevent water from seeping in at roof joints, such as walls, chimneys, dormers and valleys.
  • Gable Roof: A 2 sided roof with matching slopes on either side.
  • Granules: A ceramic-coated, crushed rock that is applied to the exposed surface of asphalt shingles. The granules are often coloured.
  • Hip Roof: A roof with four sloping sides of the same pitch. There will be no gables on a Hip Roof.
  • Ice Dam: Ice formed at the lower edge of a roof that is caused by the thawing and re-freezing of melted snow. An ice dam can force water under the shingles.
  • Ice & Water Shield: An impenetrable roofing membrane installed under shingles to prevent water that may seep under the shingles from entering the house, normally installed at the eaves edge.
  • Louvers: Slatted devices installed in a gable or soffit to ventilate the space below a roof deck and equalize air temperature and moisture.
  • Mansard Roof: A roof with an extreme pitch, often it will appear vertical. These roofs will sometimes have a flat roof on top, or a low sloped hip roof.
  • Overlay: A term used to describe installing a second or third layer of shingles. This is not a recommended practice.
  • Pitch: The roof incline measured in feet as the ratio of the rise to the run. This is also referred to as slope.
  • Ply: The number of layers of roofing material, i.e. one ply, two ply
  • Rafters: The supporting framing to which a roof deck is attached.
  • Rake: The inclined edge of a roof.
  • Ridge: The uppermost angle of the roof, where the two slopes meet.
  • Rise: The vertical distance from the eaves line to the ridge.
  • Roofing Square: 100 ft2 of roofing material installed with proper exposure. However it is not 100 ft2 of roofing material but the amount of material required to cover 100 ft2 of a roof deck.
  • Run: The horizontal distance from the eaves to a point directly under the ridge. This is one half of the span of the roof.
  • Shed Roof: A roof with only one slope. It will have no hips, ridges, valleys or gables.
  • Slope: The roof incline measured in feet as the ratio of the rise, to the run. May also be referred to as pitch.
  • Soffit: The underside of the eaves.
  • Stack Vent: A vent pipe used for ventilation from sewage drains in the house.
  • Starter Strip: Shingles applied at the roofs edge to provide protection under the cutouts and joints of the first course of shingles.
  • Step Flashing: Flashing used to protect areas where a vertical surface meets a slope.
  • Tab: The exposed portion of a shingle, defined by a cutout.
  • Truss: Engineered components that supplement rafters in many newer homes and buildings. Trusses are designed for specific applications and cannot be cut or altered.
  • Valley: The intersection formed by two slopes meeting.